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Stem Cell Banking
Stem Cell Banking

Future application of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells

The list of stem cell treatable diseases continues to grow at a rapid pace. With the potential to become different cell types, scientists are exploring the possibility of using umbilical cord blood stem cells to treat some of the most common life-threatening diseases such as heart diseases and stroke. Thus saving your baby’s umbilical cord blood now can ensure your child's access to his/her own stem cells for such cellular therapy in the future.

Current most commonly researched treatments:

Repair nerve cells

Repair nerve cells
To heal brain and spinal cord injuries or brain damage caused by stroke.

Regenerate cells to form new blood vessels

Regenerate cells
To form new blood vessels to treat heart and circulatory disease.

Replace damaged cells

Replace damaged cells
To improve recovery from cardiovascular diseases, a heart attack, or injury.

Regenerate brain cells

Regenerate brain cells
To treat brain injury, cerebral palsy and Parkinson’s disease.

How are stem cells used?

Stem Cell Transplantation

This is done to reconstitute a patient's blood and immune system, following treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, which destroys blood cells. The stem cells are infused directly into the patient's bloodstream, which migrate to the bone marrow. Inside the bone marrow environment, the stem cells begin differentiating into the three blood cell types - red blood, white blood and platelets. This initiates the regeneration of the patient's blood and immune system.

The first cord blood transplant was performed in 1988 in France, which successfully treated a 5-year old boy with Fanconi's Anaemia. To date there have been more than 40,000 cord blood stem cell transplants reported worldwide.1

Click here to read more about our successful transplant cases.

Cellular Therapies

Many newer applications are still undergoing development. In some cases, like spinal cord injury and heart attacks, the cells are directly injected into the damaged tissues. Some of the benefits experienced appear to be due to new blood vessel formation, which restores blood flow to damaged tissue.

As these treatments develop, we expect to see cord blood stem cells used in different ways. In some cases, the stem cells will be treated in the laboratory to make new cell types before use. In other cases, they will be delivered directly into the damaged tissue.


Clinical Trials

With the advancement of stem cell* research, the potential for future use of stem cell grows.

Below is a list of diseases currently under clinical trials. These are diseases for which stem cell* treatments appear to be beneficial, but have not been adopted as standard therapy. For some of these diseases, stem cell transplants only slow the progression of the disease, but do not produce a cure. For other diseases, stem cell treatments may help effect a cure, but further research is needed to determine the best candidate patients for stem cell therapy, the optimum stem cell dosage, the optimum method of cell delivery, etc.

For some patients, clinical research trials are an alternative avenue for receiving new and promising therapies that would otherwise be unavailable. Patients with difficult-to-treat or ‘incurable’ diseases, such as HIV or certain types of cancer, may choose to participate in clinical research trials should standard therapies prove to be ineffective. Clinical research trials are sometimes lifesaving.

For the latest information, please visit www.clinicaltrials.gov

  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Autism
  • Brain Tumour
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Cartilage repair
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Cleft Palate Repair (Alveolar)
  • Compartment Syndrome (Battlefield Trauma)
  • Critical Limb Ischemia
  • Crohn's disease
  • Diabetes Type 1
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa
  • Ewing Sarcoma
  • Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD)
  • Hearing Loss (acquired sensorineural)
  • HIV
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome
  • Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE)
  • Ischemic Heart Disease
  • Ischemic Stroke
  • Kidney plus stem cell transplant
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Lupus
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Myocardial Infarction
  • Open cardiac surgery for congenital heart diseases
  • Ovarian Cancer (Link to clinical trials)
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Scleroderma
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Testicular Tumour
  • Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts for cardiac defects
  • Traumatic Brain Injury

*Stem cells mentioned here comprises of other cell lines such as Mesenchymal stem cells. The clinical trials and experimental treatments listed above may be using other lines of stem cells, and not only hematopoietic stem cells.
Source:
1. Broxmeyer HE. The history of cord blood transplantation/biology & perspective for future efforts to enhance the field. http://landingpage.insights.bio/broxmeyer. Accessed September 18, 2017.
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